How to ease your child’s sore throat

Viruses are the cause of most sore throats, which cannot be cured with medication, but can only be soothed by pain management.

Did you know most sore throats are the first sign of a cold? In fact, a sore throat may be the only symptom for the first 24 hours before a cough and runny nose occurs. If your child has a sore throat, here’s how you can help make them feel more comfortable.

Throughout the year children can battle with allergies and viral infections, which may lead to a postnasal drip that causes a sore throat.

A scratchy, burning, uncomfortable sensation in the throat shouldn’t be ignored as it can often lead to a cold, and even flu, even in the peak of summer.

Viruses are the cause of most sore throats, which cannot be cured with medication but can only be soothed by pain management. However, there are some cases where a sore throat is bacterial. If your child’s sore throat doesn’t resolve itself in a few days, it’s recommended that you see your doctor.

Expert tips to ease your child’s sore throat:

Suck on lozenges

Some throat lozenges, such as Linctagon Throat Lollies, can assist in relieving throat irritation. Linctagon Throat Lollies contain active ingredients that can help with immune, infection, irritation, and antioxidant support. And they contain no artificial sweeteners.

Gargle with salt water

Gargling with salt water several times a day can help to reduce swelling and provide some comfort. Your child must gargle the salt water and spit it out, not swallow it. Make sure that your child knows how to gargle before attempting this method.

Drink warm liquids

Tea, a mixture of lemon, honey, and water, or any warm (not hot) drink is a comforting way to soothe irritation, and will also keep your child well hydrated while she is sick.

Use a heat pad

Apply a heated compress to your child’s neck. This can help with the pain on the outside of your child’s neck, and the warmth will bring some relief.

Practice good hygiene

Get your child into the habit of washing her hands regularly. This can prevent most common illnesses, including sore throats. Teach your child not to share cold drinks, eating utensils, etc. with other children who may be sick.