How to help your child cope with disappointment

So much of life is about anticipating events, and a change in plans can be extremely distressing for children.

How to help your child cope with disappointment
 If we teach our young children to manage disappointment well, it could potentially motivate good decision-making.

Whether a trip to the playground is disrupted by rain or the ice-cream shop runs out of chocolate sprinkles, life is full of small and large disappointments. And, as much as we wish we could save our children from disappointments, we just cannot – which is actually a wonderful thing.

Disappointment is a healthy feeling that children must experience.

“When children learn at a young age that they have the tools necessary to overcome adversity, they can use them throughout childhood and into adulthood,” says Robert Brooks, PhD, co-author of Raising Resilient Children. “If you go to great lengths to protect them from disappointment, you will prevent them from gaining some critical abilities.”

That’s not to say you shouldn’t lend a hand. “If you help a child learn to ask for realistic support, lean on others, communicate well, and stay optimistic, you’re assisting that child to handle what life throws at him,” says Dr Brooks.

“When children learn at a young age that they have the tools necessary to overcome adversity, they can use them throughout childhood and into adulthood,” says Robert Brooks, PhD, co-author of Raising Resilient Children. “If you go to great lengths to protect them from disappointment, you will prevent them from gaining some critical abilities.”

That’s not to say you shouldn’t lend a hand. “If you help a child learn to ask for realistic support, lean on others, communicate well, and stay optimistic, you’re assisting that child to handle what life throws at him,” says Dr Brooks.