Understanding precocious puberty

Early puberty is when a child’s body begins changing into that of an adult too soon. Rarely, certain conditions may cause precocious puberty.

Understanding precocious puberty
 The average age for girls to start puberty is 11, while for boys the average age is 12.

Understanding the signs and symptoms of early puberty, also known as precocious puberty, can allow parents to know when to seek assistance. In some cases, early puberty could be a sign of an underlying condition that may need to be treated.

What is puberty?

The first indication of puberty for most children is a sudden growth spurt, increased body odour, body hair, and acne. Boys may undergo facial hair development and a deepening of their voices.

When does puberty start?

According to the National Institutes of Health, puberty typically occurs between the ages of eight and 13 for girls and nine and 14 for boys.

Before the age of eight for boys and nine for girls, puberty is regarded to be premature. This is frequently referred to as “early puberty.”

When should I consult my child’s physician regarding early puberty?

Most cases of early puberty do not pose a health danger to children. However, it is crucial to consult a physician if you have concerns. In rare instances, early puberty may indicate a condition requiring treatment.

Premature puberty may be caused by genetic disorders that can be identified by testing. In 90% of instances involving girls, however, the cause of early puberty is unknown.

Therapies for premature puberty

In rare instances, medication may be recommended to halt or slow the onset of puberty. Medication to control hormone production may be provided by injections or a subcutaneous implant that gradually distributes medication.

Can I do anything to stop my child from experiencing premature puberty?

Most of the time, puberty is caused by hereditary causes and cannot be influenced by parental actions. However, you can assist your child in maintaining a healthy weight and limit exposure to testosterone or oestrogen, which may be present in over-the-counter creams/gels, hair treatments, pharmaceuticals, and nutritional supplements.